Game designer at Naughty Dog, software engineer, Canadian abroad
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Donair Academy (Henry Adam Svec, Chad Comeau, WL Altman, Andrew Penner)

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Donair Academy

"Donair Academy is the first educational computer game about the Halifax donair. Explore the historical, gastronomical, and acoustic dimensions of this celebrated Maritime dish. One never knows when donair knowledge will come in handy." - Author's description

Play / download on itch.io (Browser, Windows, Mac)


Donair Academy

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Gangles
7 days ago
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More trashgames about Canadian regional dishes, please.
Santa Monica, California
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What Made Age Of Empires Great

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Age of Empires is finally back. After twelve long years, Microsoft has finally decided to resurrect one of gaming’s most beloved franchises, and fans are ecstatic. If you’re unfamiliar with the series, Age’s return might not seem like such a big deal. After all, it’s not like strategy fans are lacking options.

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Gangles
26 days ago
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Santa Monica, California
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History Respawned: Walden, a game

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From: History Respawned
Duration: 30:19

Bob talks with Tracy Fullerton about Walden, a game. Topics include Henry David Thoreau's life and work, historical accuracy in games, the context of life in the 1840s, civil disobedience, and bean farming.
1:40 Why Thoreau, why Walden?
5:55 What would Thoreau make of this game?
7:00 Historical research
10:23 Historical context
12:59 Historical accuracy
18:45 Thoreau's handwriting
20:56 Chores
21:50 BEANS
24:00 Civil Disobedience

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Gangles
26 days ago
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Santa Monica, California
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Scenes from the new Overland...

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Scenes from the new Overland trailer

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5glQ5JvSx6c

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Gangles
31 days ago
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Great trailer, very intriguing!
Santa Monica, California
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The Vietnam War documentary series by Ken Burns

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Together with Lynn Novick, filmmaker Ken Burns, who has previously made long documentary films on The Civil War and World War II, has made a film about perhaps the most controversial and contentious event in American history, The Vietnam War. The film runs for 18 hours across 10 installments and begins on September 17 on PBS.

David Kamp interviewed Novick and Burns for Vanity Fair and proclaims the film a triumph:

I watched the whole series in a marathon viewing session a few days before meeting with the filmmakers — a knock-you-sideways experience that was as enlightening as it was emotionally taxing. For all their unguarded anxiety about doing the war justice, Burns and Novick have pulled off a monumental achievement. Audiovisually, the documentary is like no other Burns-branded undertaking. Instead of folksy sepia and black-and-white, there are vivid jade-green jungles and horrific blooms of napalm that explode into orange and then gradually turn smoky black. The Vietnam War was the first and last American conflict to be filmed by news organizations with minimal governmental interference, and the filmmakers have drawn from more than 130 sources for motion-picture footage, including the U.S. networks, private home-movie collections, and several archives administered by the Socialist Republic of Vietnam. The series’s depiction of the Tet offensive, in which the North Vietnamese launched coordinated attacks on the South’s urban centers, is particularly and brutally immersive, approaching a 360-degree experience in its deft stitching together of footage from various sources.

The sound and music promises to thrill as well. Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross (who did the scores for The Social Network, Gone Girl, and The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo) provided original music to supplement popular music contemporary to the time. They even got The Beatles.

Then there’s all that popular music from the 60s and 70s: more than 120 songs by the artists who actually soundtracked the times, such as Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, the Animals, Janis Joplin, Wilson Pickett, Buffalo Springfield, the Byrds, the Rolling Stones, and even the ordinarily permissions-averse and budget-breaking Beatles. Of the Beatles, Novick noted, “They basically said, We think this is an important part of history, we want to be part of what you’re doing, and we will take the same deal everybody else gets. That’s kind of unprecedented.”

I’m very much looking forward to this.

Tags: David Kamp   Ken Burns   Lynn Novick   The Vietnam War   TV   video   Vietnam War   war
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Gangles
46 days ago
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Time to find out if my bunny ears can pick up the local PBS station.
Santa Monica, California
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Loot From the Rabbit Hole of History in 'Wikipedia: The Text Adventure'

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I'm on an adventure through the sun-scorched plains of Nevada. In my pocket is a Saxon minister, Saint Mary and the county of Devon. I head west, towards Las Vegas, a greenish-yellow pixel blob in the distance. I take "gambling," decide I'm bored, and teleport to NASA.

This is a five-minute excerpt of my time on Kevan Davis' Wikipedia: The Text Adventure, a surprisingly entertaining re-skinning of the encyclopedic website as a recognizably lumpy, pixel-art-illustrated take on interactive fiction. Each page is a location, with directions offered—go west to see the Temple of Zeus at Olympia, or go northeast to find the Syro-Malankara Catholic Eparchy of the United States of America and Canada.

There are, of course, games that have formed around the network of knowledge that Wikipedia provides—a friend and I spent a memorable evening giving each other targets like "bread," starting off on the same random page, and trying to beat each other to the goal through simply clicking on the links within each page. Rumor has it that clicking on the first link on any given article will eventually get you to "Philosophy."

But Davis' take provides a level of absurdity that abstracts even further from Wikipedia's point of edification. You are no longer merely a researcher in a vast library; you are a thief of history, a hoarder of words.

As with most text adventures, you have an inventory, and as soon as you discover that you can "take" things from each page, the journey becomes less about a leisurely walk through the sum of all human knowledge and more about wanting to fill your pockets with stupid things. I currently own the whole of Canada, an entire city block, October 16th in the year 1834, and 3,800 coastal islands.

I just haven't found which door they unlock, yet.

Follow Kate on Twitter.



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Gangles
65 days ago
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Santa Monica, California
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